The Role of Pacific Marginal Seas
in Linking Adjacent Land with Ocean

   

To understand Earth systems, it is important to understand how the land and the ocean are linked, and marginal seas are key sites where such linkage occurs. The South China Sea, the East China Sea, the Japan Sea, the Sea of Okhotsk, and the Bering Sea, i.e., marginal seas along the northwest rim of the Pacific Ocean, are all strongly influenced by the land via river discharges, which also reflect human influences. Compared with other oceanic regions, marginal seas have high productivity and biogeochemical cycling activity, which are controlled by separate local processes, such as freshwater discharge, interior current systems, tidal mixing, local upwelling, interactions with the continental shelf, sea ice production and melting, and flow through straits. Further, some marginal seas have been shown to have a strong influence on physical and biogeochemical processes in the open Pacific Ocean. Therefore, it is important to investigate the role that marginal seas play in linking the land with oceanic regions to clarify the whole Pacific Ocean system.

In this program, we would like to discuss the linkage of the land and the ocean, and the roles of marginal seas, from scientific aspect.

Member

Program Leader
Jun NISHIOKA
Pan-Okhotsk Research Center, Associate Professor
Humio MITSUDERAPan-Okhotsk Research Center, Professor
Takayuki SHIRAIWAPan-Okhotsk Research Center, Associate Professor
Tomohiro NAKAMURAPan-Okhotsk Research Center, Lecturer
Sumito MATOBAPan-Okhotsk Research Center, Assistant Professor
Naoto EBUCHIAtmosphere-Ocean Interaction Group, Professor
Takenobu TOYOTAAtmosphere-Ocean Interaction Group, Assistant Professor
Osamu SEKIAtmospheric Chemistry and Organic Geochemistry Group, Associate Professor
Kay I. OHSHIMA Ocean and Sea Ice Dynamics Group, Professor
Yoshimasa MATSUMURAAtmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo
Seiya NAGAOInstitute of Nature and Environmental Technology, Kanazawa Univeristy
Ichiro YASUDAAtmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo

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